Knife Sheath – Great Lakes Style Loom Beaded

Knife Sheath - Great Lakes Style Loom Beaded
Knife Sheath – Great Lakes Style Loom Beaded

Our Great Lakes Style Loom Beaded Knife Sheath features bright colored designs and beaded fringe! Master Craftsman Andy Bullock created this Knife Sheath in a 19th century Great Lakes style. The Old color beads add fantastic, colorful detail. He added edge beading to the top and one side in Royal Blue Seed Beads. Additionally, he added Clear Yellow Seed Bead trim.

Andy lined the Knife Sheath with Strap Leather.  He created the strap from an old Wool Blanket. He trimmed the strap with Blue Ribbon and White Seed Beads.

The Knife Sheath measures 14″ long x 3″ wide. The beaded fringe with Red Wool Tassels measure 4″ long.  The Wool Strap measures 23″ long x 1″ wide.

This Loom Beaded Knife Sheath will make a  great Native American Regalia accessory. You will also find it a perfect addition to your Native American Beadwork collection!

One of a Kind!

Knife Sheath – Tack

Knife Sheath - Tack
Knife Sheath – Tack

We make our Tack Knife Sheaths here at the shop. We use Saddle Brown Strap Seather adorned with brass tacks.  They come ready to use, just add your knife and slide onto a belt.

Our Leather Knife Sheaths make a nice addition to your dance regalia or for trekking in the woods.

Each Sheath measures approx. 9″ long x 3.5″ wide. Because they are handmade, size and tacks may vary.

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DRAFTED 10-7-20

Knife English Scalper

Knife English Scalper
Knife English Scalper

This English Scalper Knife comes from craftsman Ken Hamilton. He forged the blade by hand and created the handle. Ken also made a hand tooled leather Knife Sheath to go with it.

You will find his maker’s mark on the blade.

The Knife measures approximately 9.75″ long, with a 6″ blade.

Limited Quantities!

Shop for Knives and Sheaths!

Wool Knife Sheath with Beaded Fringe – 20% Off!

Wool Knife Sheath with Beaded Fringe
Wool Knife Sheath with Beaded Fringe

Master Craftsman Andy Bullock created this unique Knife Sheath from Navy Blue Wool fabric.  The top of the sheath features the selvage edge of a trade blanket.  Andy added beaded gold ribbon to three sides of the sheath.

Andy made a loomed panel that ends with beaded fringe for the front of the sheath.  He attached strands of Green and White Pony beads to the bottom. Red wool tassels appear at the bottom of the loom fringe and the Pony Bead fringe.

The Knife Sheath measures 12″ x 3.25″. The bottom fringe measures 5″ long.

One of a Kind!

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Knife Sheath – Yellow Geometric Beaded Panel

Knife Sheath - Yellow Geometric Beaded Panel
Knife Sheath – Yellow Geometric Beaded Panel

You will delight in this Braintanned Leather Knife Sheath! Master Craftsman Andy Bullock created this sheath from Braintanned Deerskin Leather. It features a loomwork panel of Greasy Yellow, Green, Clear Red and Clear Blue Seed Beads on the front. Andy edged the sheath with Maroon ribbon and White Seed Beads.
Strands of  White and Navy Blue Pony Beads serve as fringe. Red wool tufts finish this piece.

This Knife Sheath measures 9.5″ long x 3″ wide.

One of a Kind!

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Plains Indian Knife Sheaths

Plains Indian Knife Sheaths
Plains Indian Knife Sheaths

Materials, Design and Construction. By Alex Kozlov. Softcover. 64 pgs.

Use this fully illustrated guidebook to make decorated Knife Sheaths. This book covers how to use beads, fringe, cones and tacks to decorate your own Knife Sheath.  It also includes sections of historical photographs and color photographs of decorated sheaths from various collections.

Color photographs and illustrations.

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Read the Denver Art Museum Leaflet Plains Beads and Beadwork Designs.

Pattern – Plume Indian Women’s Accessories

Pattern - Plume Indian Women's Accessories
Pattern – Plume Indian Women’s Accessories

You will find patterns for a variety of accessories in our Plume Women’s Leather Accessories Patterns. Native American women used accessories like these for their everyday activities. They expressed their tribal affiliations through the decorations they added to the items.  We recommend that you research the decorating styles for the tribe you wish to design for.

This pack includes pattern for the following:

  • Tobacco Pouch
  • Mirror Pouch
  • Ration Card Bag
  • Fringed Bag
  • Side Fringed Bag
  • Knife Sheath
  • Scissors Pouch
  • Awl Case

Most of these require small amounts of leather, up to 12.5″ x 10″.  The Knife Sheath and the Awl Case also need a piece of Rawhide measuring 5″ x 8″ or 9″ as a lining. You may use lightweight Deerskin Leather Splits for some of these items. For some items, like the Knife Sheath, you may choose to use Cowhide Strap Leather. If you wish to add fringe, please purchase additional Leather for that.

Native Americans often decorated these accessories with Seed Beads, Porcupine Quills, Leather Fringe, Metal Cones, Wool Fabric, Deer Hair and more.

Shop all of our Patterns!

Technique of Porcupine Quill Decoration

Technique of Porcupine Quill Decoration

Technique of Porcupine Quill Decoration

Among the Indians of North America.  By William C. Orchard. Softcover. 82 pages.

This reprint of the 1916 original edition is a classic study of Native American Porcupine Quillwork.   It outlines several techniques for decorating items with Porcupine Quills including Wrapping, Weaving, and Sewing.  Native Americans have used Porcupine Quills to decorate Moccasins, Knife Sheaths, Birchbark containers and more!

You will find it full of Black & White photographs of items decorated with Quills, line drawings of techniques and four pages of color plates.

ISBN 9780943604008

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Watch Chris show you how to do Porcupine Quill Work!

Scrap Leather Bag – Cowhide Strap

Scrap Leather Bag - Cowhide Strap
Scrap Leather Bag – Cowhide Strap

We offer our top quality Strap Leather Scraps in pre-packaged assortments. You will receive a variety of sizes and colors. You can use these pieces for smaller projects like knife sheaths, small bags, stamping projects and kids’ crafts.

We also have limited quantities of NARROW strips of Strap Leather. These also come in a variety of colors and lengths, none over 2″ wide.  You will get a large bag, comparable to the photo.

If you require more square footage for your project, please see our Strap Leather available by the square foot. Or you may like our pre-cut strips of Strap Leather for Belts and straps.

Deer Antler Tips

Deer Antler Tips
Deer Antler Tips

You can use Natural Deer Antler Tips Antler tips for a variety of projects.   Drill them for use on Necklaces or as bag toggle closures.  Additionally you can cut and drill them to make antler buttons or use them for Knife handles.

Our Deer Antler Tips measure between 3″ – 4″ long.  The diameters will vary.

Deer Antler Tips are a natural product, so expect variations.

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Brass Tacks – Plated

Brass Tacks - Plated
Brass Tacks – Plated

Brass Tacks are like those seen on historical accessories. Ours are base metal with Brass-Plating.

Use them to decorate Tack Belts, Knife Sheaths, Quirts, Gun Stocks, Cradleboards etc.

We sell our Plated Brass Tacks in three sizes:

  • 1/4″
  • 5/16″
  • 1/2″

You can purchase them in packages of 100 and 1000.

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Crow Loop Necklace Instructions

Crow Loop

Crow Loop Necklace Instructions

The Native Americans of the Northern Plains often wear Crow Loop Necklaces.  These necklaces feature multiple strands of beads strung between two leather strips. Crafters also add Deerskin Leather fringe to the sides. Wearers add shell, metal or beaded rosette conchos to the top or the center. Additional drops can personalize each necklace.

Materials Needed:

You can acquire these materials separately or purchase a Crow Loop Necklace Kit from The Wandering Bull, LLC with the supplies you need to make a Crow Loop Necklace!

Continue reading Crow Loop Necklace Instructions

Links of Interest

Wandering Bull Links of InterestWe have listed here links that we think may be of interest to our friends and customers. Please email us if you find something no longer works!

Museum and Collection Websites:

Native Organizations:

Family Links:

Looking for the New England Powwow Schedule?

View Events Calendar Now

Check out our How To Videos!

Thunder on the Beach Powwow

Thunder on the Beach Powwow

Time: Gates open 4pm on Friday and 10am on Saturday and Sunday

Location: Indian River County Fairgrounds 7955 58th Ave Vero Beach Fl 32976

Details:   The Florida Indian Heritage Association presents Thunder on the Beach powwow: February 19-21, 2021 at the Indian River County Fairgrounds.

This will be a public event. Everyone is welcome. Intertribal dancing, vendors and activities.

Some of the amazing things you will see:
Crazy Flute: NAMI Award winning Flute Player

Cody Boettner: 2019 World Hoop Dance Champion

Award Winning Drums: Warpaint and Ottertrail

The Aztec Dancers
Lash and Steel: John Bailey,  Guinness Book World Record holder, Knife Thrower & Bullwhip Specialist

Project 425: with Iroquois Huey

Admission is $10 for adults and $5 for children, ages 6-12. Advance Ticket Discount $8 for adults

Visit our facebook event here:https://fb.me/e/cIW4PicAb
Buy Tickets Here: https://store13280038.ecwid.com/
Camping is available-primitive and RV sites.

Contact:  772-519-7888  INfo@fiha.us  https//:fiha.us

FIHA 55th Annual Powwow and Native American Experience

FIHA 55th Annual Powwow and Native American Experience

Time: Gates open 4pm on Friday and 10am on Saturday and Sunday

Location: St Lucie County Fairgrounds 15601 W Midway Rd Port St Lucie FL 34945

Details:   The Florida Indian Heritage Association presents our 55th Annual FIHA March powwow: March 26-28, 2021 at the St Lucie County Fairgrounds.

This will be a public event. Everyone is welcome. Intertribal dancing, vendors and activities.

Some of the amazing things you will see:
Crazy Flute: NAMI Award winning Flute Player
Cody Boettner: 2019 World Hoop Dance Champion
Award Winning Drums: Warpaint and Ottertrail
The Aztec Dancers
Lash and Steel: John Bailey, Guinness Book World Record holder, Knife Thrower & Bullwhip Specialist
Project 425: with Iroquois Huey

Admission is $10 for adults and $5 for children, ages 6-12. Advance Ticket Discount $8 for adults

Visit our facebook event here: https://fb.me/e/6zItsegGI
Buy Tickets Here: https://store13280038.ecwid.com/
Camping is available-primitive and RV sites.

Contact:  INfo@fiha.us  https//:fiha.us

Porcupine Roach Instructions

porcupine roach

Making a Porcupine Roach

The  Porcupine Roach is one of the most beautiful and practical headpieces of the North American Indian. Many different men’s dance styles use porcupine roaches.  The following directions will show you how to make a long porcupine roach.   You can also use the same technique to make a shorter or a round porcupine roach.

Materials Needed:

  • Porcupine hair
  • Roach Base
  • Imitation Sinew
  • Deer Tails
  • Large Needle
  • Scissors
  • Frame for tying rows of hair
  • Glass Jar/ Cup  approx. 4″ tall x 3″ wide (to hold the Porcupine hair)
  • Roach Stick (a 2.5″ dowel 6″ longer than the finished roach – with a nail in the top to hold the roach in place)
  • Elastic style bandage for wrapping completed roach

Continue reading Porcupine Roach Instructions

Native Americans and Buffalo

Native Americans and Buffalo

Native Americans and Buffalo

Native Americans and Buffalo have a long history together. Buffalo, or the American Bison, has played an essential role in the survival and culture of the Native Americans who lived in the Plains region of what is now the United States, and parts of southern Canada.  Buffalo once roamed the Plains in innumerable herds until the middle of the 19th century. Incursions by white settlers and the arrival of the railroad severely depleted the number of Buffalo living on the Plains.  Native Americans use of every part of a Buffalo for food, clothing, tools, fuel and utensils. Continue reading Native Americans and Buffalo

Hand Made Dolls

Hand Made Dolls 
Hand Made Dolls

If there is a universal child’s toy, it may well be a doll.  Whether hastily made from scrap material at hand, or painstakingly made to exacting detail, dolls “speak” to our humanity.  At first glance, dolls are simple play-things… suffering the ravages of many other mere “toys”.  However, there are many other reasons dolls are created and decorated for children.  Dolls may also be used to teach children important cultural and educational lessons in dress, hair style, adornment and dexterity.

Some dolls are created for specific purposes or occasions.  Others are made with whimsy and artistic license.  There are no limits to the variety of dolls.  This author is particularly interested in beadwork as a decorative medium.  By making a basic cloth doll body, there are unlimited ways to construct and decorate these miniature personalities. Continue reading Hand Made Dolls